What Are You Really Missing Out On?

Our phones are literally glued to our hands 24/7, from the moment our alarm goes off to the moment our phones slip and hit us in the face in bed. Our phones are literally distracting us from what is happening around us! What are we actually missing as we have our heads buried in our phone? Have you ever wondered?

How about we give you a list of some of the crazy and great things you aren’t seeing!

1.That cute photo shoot for their new Instagram selfie

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2. A potential bae that  just walked past. They checked you out but you were replying to that text.

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3. That wall or tree right in front of you!!!!

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4. the beautiful scenery and view.

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But on a serious note!

There are many dangers to not looking up and being aware of what is happening around you.

  1. Someone following you – if you aren’t paying attention to what is happening, you could be followed and attacked. It is better to be alert at night and when alone
  2. Oncoming vehicles – pedestrian injuries due to phone use are up 35% since 2010
  3. Missing important information – whether safety information, tips for that hard essay or some of the latest goss
  4. Getting lost – you may completely get yourself lost and what happens if you are out of data or don’t have reception??

So every now and then look up and see the crazy things going on and protect yourself. Maybe even save your always declining battery and data limit!

x BL x

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4 thoughts on “What Are You Really Missing Out On?

  1. Luke says:

    This fixation to our phones extends to dangers for young people in regards to driving. A simple trip up the road can turn fatal due to young teenagers inability to keep both hands on the wheel and leave social outside of the car.

    In regard to what we are missing out on, i believe a dramatic effect mobile phone use creates, is separation between families. I am not talking about it forcing families apart, rather bonds between mother and daughter or son and dad are heavily impacted as son or daughter don’t have time to share their life experience with mum and dad anymore.

    I also believe believe there is an aspect of not just what we are missing out on, but also what we are gaining from these dreaded devices. An example of this is the literature and numerical skills of the uocming generations being at all time low levels.

    Liked by 1 person

    • brittanyhannah94 says:

      I couldn’t agree more. Phones are detrimental to not only ourselves but to others around us whether we are pedestrians, passengers or drivers. Phones are considered private items so not sharing those moments with family and friends definitely causes a drift in relationships. Our language is changed to more of a colloquial and abbreviated language.I know I have used emojis and abbreviations to communicate and sometimes struggle stringing sentences together. There needs to be more emphasis on English skill rather than focus on ‘textspeak’.

      Like

  2. loveyourselfright says:

    Thank you for sharing this nice post! I totally understand the first point on serious note. One of my friend actually experienced this before. He was just walking at night alone doing his smartphone so he couldn’t realise that someone was actually following him. That guy hit my friend’s head with some kind of weapon. So my friend was fainted for short time alone on street. I think it’s really dangerous doing smartphone or wearing earphone while walking alone at night.

    Like

  3. Rachel Leshaw says:

    I talked to a bouncer outside of a New York City nightclub who said that over the years he has noticed people in the club are on their phones more then they are dancing or enjoying the scene around them. I often leave my phone at home when I go to a club because my jeans are too tight to put it in my pocket! and I’m not about to carry a purse. some people think I’m nuts for going anywhere without it. “what if you have an emergency?” they ask. in that case I can borrow someone else’s phone. Or proceed however we did 15 years ago!

    Like

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